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EARLY CONCERT BAND LEADERS OF NEW ORLEANS

(2016) During the last two decades of the nineteenth century and the first three of the 20th century the most popular music for concerts was the concert band, also called the Military Concert Band. With many great musicians they played at resorts, playgrounds and other social functions. Only a few of these conductors are known to New Orleans in our generation. I have found about 40 such conductors. Their band activities and concert programs are given in each bio.

CONCERT BANDS

A review of the concert bands that played at the resorts and playgrounds in and around New Orleans. Many concerts for the public were given and these programs are given within the text.

TANGO BELT

(2016) Jazz grew up in the Tango Belt, an area on the Rampart St. side of the French Quarter. Here there were many clubs, most having jazz bands and vaudeville acts. The area was a dangerous one, especially for single women. The custom was to have a drink, dance, have a good time in the cabaret and then go to Storyville. After some sailors were killed in Storyville, the Navy closed down the district, which included Storyville and the Tango Belt.

VAUDEVILLE AND BASEBALL

(2015) Star baseball players of the early era of the game used their fame to go on the vaudeville stage and do acts with famous vaudeville stars of the day. Many were good performers but some played on their popularity to have huge offers of money that was often much more than their baseball salaries. Babe Ruth, Mike Donlin and other ball players had great success and played to huge audiences.

VAUDEVILLE BIOS

(2015) Vaudeville was a very popular form of entertainment in the latter part and later part of the 1900s. Vaudeville was also a a vehicle for jazz to be presented to audiences.

THE STORIES BEHIND THE SONGS – THE STANDARDS

(2015) Who has not heard of Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Richard Rodgers and so many others? It was because of my research in early jazz history and the repertoire of early jazz bands that I became interested in the whys, how, etc., behind the writing of each song. Many songs have very interesting stories connected to them; many were just written to fit into a Broadway play, movie or record. In this collection I have researched the story behind nearly 600 popular standard songs.

THE STORIES BEHIND THE SONGS – VOLUME 2

(2015) This eBook is a collection of five separate works devoted to the stories behind songs with specific themes. Included are nearly 200 song stories arranged in the following manner:

   Christmas (58 songs)
   Irish (28 songs)
   Patriotic (70 songs)
   TV theme tunes (42 songs)
   Whiting-Gershwin (ongoing)

HISTORY OF THE BLUES

(2014) In the early part of the 20th century Negro blues were becoming very popular. Most composers of popular music wrote blues. This essay gives the influences that led to the blues form and brought the Negro folk blues to the world. Hundreds of blues printed music is given up to 1930.

THE RESORTS OF NEW ORLEANS

(2015) The most popular resorts for the summer season in early New Orleans were the West End and Spanish fort. They were amusement parks and had band concerts as an added attraction. Prior to these two resorts New Orleanians would go to the popular Carrollton Gardens and Magnolia Gardens for summer recreation. All had band concerts as attractions.

A RESEARCHER’S VIEW ON NEW ORLEANS JAZZ HISTORY

THIS FILE WAS CREATED PRIOR TO HURRICANE KATRINA. THE ORIGINAL MUSEUM WAS DESTROYED BUT THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS STILL ACCURATE AND VALID.

1995 (139 pages)
Based on the panels of the New Orleans Jazz Museum (Dr. Koenig was the jazz musicologist for the museum and designed and wrote a number of the panels). This work presents the texts of each panel plus and up-to-date addition of the most recent research on the information presented on these panels. This additional research material amplifies the most current theories and findings of contemporary jazz scholars and researchers. Much of early jazz history has been secured by oral interviews. These interviews, while very informative and interesting, often contain repeats of legends and old remembrances and should only be used as a starting point for scholarly research to change remembrances, theories and mis-concepts into concrete facts. This book is a complete history of the evolution of New Orleans Jazz Music.

STRING BANDS: THE ANCESTORS OF THE JAZZ BAND

2000 (125 pages)
Varying in instrumentation, the String Band was the name of the early ensemble of instruments that shared the scene with the brass bands of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Many musical organizations were called by the town or as a personal name such as: ‘The Milneburg String Band,’ or ‘The Bud Scott String Band.’ These musical ensembles served many styles of music, and a group of musicians could furnish music whether they were hired as a brass, string or smaller ensemble. The size of the ensemble was dictated by the size of the hall or the check book of the sponsoring group or the availability of musicians. The prominence of the string instruments (especially the violin) and the evolving of the string/brass band into jazz bands is examined. One thing to remember – names must not be taken literally – many times an ensemble was simply called a band or orchestra.

“UNDER THE INFLUENCE”: THE FOUR HORNSMEN OF NEW ORLEANS EARLY JAZZ

1994 (197 pages)
Fame many times goes to the best publicized individuals, leaving those who have had the greatest influence forgotten and never given the credit deserved. Thus we present: three cornet players whose influence can be seen in Louis Armstrong and one legendary cornetist whose playing influenced Bix Beiderbecke.Is there any great artist who has not been influenced by another’s style as he was developing his own unique style? Is not everyone’s style of playing at first a combination of others’? No artist can develop without influences. Read the development and history of four early jazz cornetist of early jazz: Buddy Petit, Chris Kelly, ‘Kid’ Rena and Emmett Hardy.

“SONIC BOOM” DRUMS AND DRUMMERS IN EARLY NEW ORLEANS JAZZ

1994 (93 pages)
The drums (or traps as they were first called) gave early jazz its character. Their development coincides with the evolution of jazz. There was a whole generation of drummers before ‘Zutty’ Singleton and ‘Baby’ Dodds. It was this early generation that developed jazz drumming. Traps are spoken of as early as the last decade of the 19th Century and the evolution of the 3 piece drum or percussion section of the marching band, evolving into the ‘double drums’ to the one piece drum set is traced. This work notates what the early drummers have to say about their art and how the various drumming techniques helped evolve a new style of dance music – jazz. (There was no ‘high-hat’ present in early jazz, and African drumming did not include drum rolls.)

THE JAZZ BIOS – VOLUME 1

2002 (119 pages)
Many of the earliest jazz musicians are not known and their importance not realized before. Harrison Barnes, Sonny Henry, Jim Robinson and Willie Parker – all taught by Professor James Humphrey in the lower part of the Mississippi River. “Snoozer” Quinn, the great Guitarist from Bogalusa, La; Norman Brownlee-leader of a jazz band on the West Bank of New Orleans that included Emmett Hardy; Manuel Perez, the legendary New Orleans cornetist that was one of the first Creole musician to have a band in Chicago in 1915; The two New Orleans musicians who migrated early to Chicago that brought up New Orleans musicians to play in their bands (Dave Peyton & Charlie Elgar); Tom and Steve Brown, who brought the first white band to Chicago from New Orleans. The La 5 – that included Anton Lada and Alcide “Yellow” Nunez.

THE JAZZ BIOS – VOLUME 2

2009 (94 pages)
One tends to recognize the musicians of the present but fail to recognize nor give credit to the ‘stars’ of the past. Such is the case for early jazz band leaders. There are bands and their leaders, while not well known in the present, were front and center in their era. While there were an uncountable number of ‘big bands’ in the 20’s, in this book we’ll showcase a few of the more memorable ‘star bands’. The list includes: Vincent Lopez, whose popularity rivaled that of Paul Whiteman, Roger Wolfe Kahn, whose father was rich and helped his son’s band become one of the best, Paul Specht, an important person in his era and had a 2nd career in aviation in the Second World War, Ted Lewis, an early jazz clarinetist who became a huge name in the entertainment world (this contains personal info from his grand daughter), Jimmy Durante, an early jazz pianist who also became a big star in the entertainment business, and material on Earl Fuller and Wilbaur Sweatman.

THE JAZZ ESSAYS I

1996 (93 pages)

MUSICAL CONTESTS FROM THE GREEKS TO NEW ORLEANS BUCKING/CUTTING CONTEST

THE ORIGIN OF JAZZ ELEMENTS, AFRICAN, EUROPEAN, ISLAMIC, ETC.” Traces the elements of jazz (improvisation, syncopation, call and response, etc.) from their earliest beginnings in music.

COMPARISON TO EARLY JAZZ: AFRICAN MUSIC, THE MARCH, THE SPIRITUAL AND THE NEW ENGLAND STYLE OF CHURCH MUSIC.” An examination of the techniques of African musical performance in comparison to other cultures. African improvising style was not “theme and variation” that was applied to early jazz, but the use of the style of metamorphosis.

THE MARCH, BRASS/STRING BANDS AND JAZZ.” Traces the history of the military march from its earliest beginnings to the march form that evolved into the ragtime form and style. Includes its versatility from its marching duties to its performance as dance music. Describes the New Orleans marching band’s evolution into the jazz band.

THE EVOLUTION OF RAGTIME STYLE TO JAZZ STYLE.” Traces the development of early Negro music into the ragtime style, from the cakewalk to the use of ragtime as the name of early jazz style music of the early 20th Century.

THE DIFFUSION OF EARLY AFRO/AMERICAN MUSIC & CULTURE LEADING TO JAZZ.” A sociological view of how the Negro and his music fit into the culture of a new, foreign social system of the young and developing United States.

FOLK SONG TO ART SONG.” Traces the route and the evolution of Negro folk music – from the work songs, spirituals, etc. to the popular ragtime style.

THE ADVENT OF THE COUNTERPOINT TO HARMONY AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO JAZZ DEVELOPMENT.” With a section analyzing the Original Dixieland Jazz Band’s recording of ‘Livery Stable Blues,’ this essay includes a history of counterpoint/polyphony. How does the counterpoint of early jazz compare with the rules of Bachian counterpoint and how did the early jazz musicians think when improvising chord progressions – according to scales or just by ear?

THE HISTORY OF IMPROVISING IN REGARD TO JAZZ HISTORY.” Music began in an improvisational style and developed in each period of music, reaching its zenith in improvising style in the jazz of the 20th Century. Did jazz begin as an improvised music or was it the result of early unschooled musicians attempts to duplicate music heard from the existing reading dance bands?

THE JAZZ ESSAYS II

2001 – (143 pages)
Josie Arlington/Lobrano/Mary Anna Deubler – The famous madam of storyville led a double life living in Abita Springs, Ca. north of New Orleans over Lake Pontchartrain. The famous madam of storyville led a double life living in Abita Springs, Ca. north of New Orleans over Lake Pontchartrain.

Jazz Elements – The origins of jazz are found in other types of music and used in jazz to create a new style of music.

First Slave Band – The earliest example of a slave musical band is found in Charleston, South Carolina. Known as the Lilliputs this band of young slaves gave concerts throughout the South.

White Jazz – Gives the history of how white New Orleans musicians also were ‘in on’ the evolution of the jazz style.

Evolution of Ragtime and the Cakewalk – Traces the evolution of Ragtime from its earliest origins and the role of the Cakewalk in this evolution.

The Destruction of Armstrong’s House – In spite of the work of the New Orleans Jazz Club Armstrong’s first house was plowed under and burnt.

Basin Street Flashbacks – This earliest of jazz publications gives some small articles on some of the earliest jazz musicians and their careers.

Wa-Wan Press – Arthur Farwell’s publication that contains compositions of early 20th century composers using melodies from Indian and Negro melodies for compositional material. A number of Negro orientated melodies are given.

May Irwin – One of the great and earliest ‘coon’ shouters using Negro style ragtime melodies on Broadway.

Brass Bands & the Two-Step – Examines the evolution of the march style into the two-step style.

Origin of the word Jazz – Gives a number of sources for the origin of the word jazz.

A Trip to the Past – A visit to some New Orleans dance halls during their existence. Gives a good example of what really went on in those famous dance halls in early jazz.

A New Look at John Philip Sousa’s Through his Popular Music – Sousa wrote other style and not just marches. He wrote some minstrel songs and used the ragtime style in some of his famous band suites.

Autocrat Social and Pleasure Club – Examines the role and the social activities by this early Pleasure Club and gives a schedule of activities sponsored and hosted by the Club.

THE JAZZ ESSAYS III – More essays on Jazz subjects:

2002 (282 pages)
The Catholic Church and Early Jazz – Examines the role and activities sponsored by various southern Catholic Churches using jazz for dances and fairs as well as using musical ensembles during church services.

Early Italian American Jazz – New Orleans of Italian decent played an important role in the development of early jazz.

Robert Hingle – Master Band Leader – In the lower dealt area of the Mississippi River Robert Hingle lead various musical ensembles, wrote for the local newspaper about these bands, their activities and repertoire and was also the choir master in St. Thomas Catholic church of Point a la Hache, La.

Emanuel Chol of Thibodaux, LA – Trained in Paris Chol played organ, directed the church choir and was leader of one of the earliest brass bands in southern Louisiana.

Band Instrumentation and Repertoire – A partial list of the various bands of southern Louisiana listing their instrumentation and repertoire.

Jazz on Early Radio – Gives the early history of the radio and the programming of early jazz on radio, an activity that propagated jazz’s influence and popularity.

JAZZ STUDIES: VOLUMNE ONE

2009 (198 pages)

Jazz evolved and progressed through the music of the minstrels, Cakewalks, Blues, Ragtime and American popular music. From “Jim Crow” to the music played by early New Orleans jazz bands. We also find a list of the top 15 songs of the last 50 years – from “Georgia Campmeeting” to “New Orleans Blues.” We also examine the introduction of the saxophone into the jazz orchestra with mention of the “Brown Brother’s,” Rudy Wiedoeft and early magazine articles on the use of the sax in jazz. Included is a look at the evolution of syncopation in early American music. Finally we examine Ragtime and its influence on early jazz. This section includes material on Stephen Foster, Sidney Lanier and J. P. Sousa.

TRINITY OF EARLY JAZZ LEADERS: JOHN ROBICHAUX, CLAIBORNE WILLIAMS AND “TOOTS” JOHNSON

1996 (222 pages)
Contemporaries, these three band leaders were the most popular in the tri-city area of New Orleans, Donaldsonville and Baton Rouge. Theirs were the dominant bands in their respective cities, and while all included reading musicians, they always included improvising players, thus making their bands ‘jazz’ bands. The careers of these men span the evolution of jazz music. The examination of their careers and the music they played gives us a running account of the evolution of jazz. An appendix includes short essays on A. J. Piron, Bud Scott of Natchez, Miss., and ‘Papa’ Celestin.

FIVE LEGENDARY MUSIC TEACHERS OF EARLY JAZZ/DANCE/BRASS BANDS

1996 (106 pages)
The lives and careers of five of the most important teachers of early jazz musicians. Included are: Emmanuel Chol, James Humphrey, Robert Hingle, Herman Kuhn and Emile Tosso. All except Kuhn possessed outstanding character.

MAMIE SMITH

There are three most popular ‘blues’ singers that used jazz bands. Many other blues singers are in vaudeville, too many to mention. I choose Mamie Smith, Bessie Smith and Ma Rainey. All used jazz bands to accompany their act. All made fortunes during their career.

ONWARD BRASS BAND

The Onward and Excelsior Bands were two of the oldest and most popular of the Negro bands that were playing in New Orleans. As seen in the articles given below their activities-mostly playing for funerals, parades, picnic and other social activities, but seldom played a concert program. also, they were usually small ensembles, not the huge instrumentation of the white concert bands such as Tosso or Paoletti.

ODJB

The Original Dixieland Jazz Band (ODJB) place in jazz history has been well documented. This band made the first jazz recording. In this expose an analysis is given with each of the three melodic parts given in score. One can see that the Counterpoint played by the 3 horns, analyzing from the point of a Bachian C.P. technique, is far from accepted academic practice. Also given are a number of ODJB compositions.
We also find the composition ‘I Got the Blues’ the first Blues that was published (1908) by Anthony Maggio of New Orleans.

TIN ROOF BLUES

Many of the early jazz group’s repertoire became jazz standards. The history of these songs is both interesting and historic. Groups: the ODJB, Nork (New Orleans Rhythm Kings), the Louisiana 5, Jelly Roll Morton and others musical charts are in evidence. The history behind the song ‘The Tin Roof Blues’ is given in detail.

THE SAXOPHONE

The saxophone became an important addition to the traditional instrumentation of the early jazz combo. The instrument first was used as a ‘single’ but as jazz developed a complete family of saxophones was used. A progression of the saxophone’s use is seen by the scores given as it progressed in written jazz arrangements.

NEW COLLECTION OF BIOS

A number of musicians that were active in the early jazz of the 1920s with their contributions being paramount in the progress of popular and jazz music. Given are: Steve Brown Ted Lewis, Fate Marable, Eubie Blake, Edward Taylor Paul, Paul Whiteman and Vincent Lopez.

JELLY ROLL MORTON

Jelly was a major jazz performer and composer and has a prominent place in early jazz. A number of his compositions are found in score and a short history of these songs is given.

THE EVOLUTION OF SYNCOPATION AND IMPROVISING

The musical technique of Syncopation and Improvising were found early in musical history. These two compositional elements were important in the development of the jazz style. We see the progress of these two elements used earlier in the music of the Trecendo music of the 13 & 14th century, in the ‘basse dance’ of the 15th and early 16th century and even used by many of the masters such as Brahms, Beethoven and others.

In the 16th century improvising was emphasized while in the Romantic period improvising was in the background. It surfaced with the Negro minstrel and in the popularity of ragtime. A large number of articles on ragtime describes the use of syncopation and of course improvising was a major element in early jazz.

CLARENCE AND SPENCER WILLIAMS

Not related, the two Williams’ were prominent composers of popular and jazz music. Between the two we find many major jazz standards that are still played by today’s jazz bands. They also wrote a number of ‘Blues’ the style being popular in the early days of jazz.

JACK LAINE

Jack ‘Papa’ Laine is considered the father of ‘white jazz.’ His bands included many of the future stars of jazz. His band was the most popular in New Orleans during his era. The band was known as a jazz band, playing for the many social activities around the city of New Orleans. These many activities are written in the newspapers of his day. Alcide ‘Yellow’ Nunez was a great clarinet player, being a member of the ODJB and the La.5.

HYMNS & SPIRITUALS

Spiritual music has always been a part of the Negro race. It helped them when in slavery and formed a prominent place in the development of early minstrel, ragtime and jazz. Some of the music used at funerals and in Negro church services are many of the music given below. Scared music was always used by the Negro race and a hymn used in the Civil Rights Movement (We Shall Overcome) was a moving testament to their faith. Many of the hymns given below are foundations of early jazz.

MILHAUD

One of the most famous classical French composers of the 20th century was a student of jazz and wrote the first classical composition using jazz elements ‘Creation of the world’.

JAZZ COLLECTION OF JAZZ BIOS I, II, III

A large number of bios on early jazz musicians.

JAZZ MAP OF NEW ORLEANS

1983 – A comprehensive compilation of more than 600 marked performance locations of halls, clubs, cabarets, etc., and residences of New Orleans Jazz musicians. Since Hurricane Katrina, many of the locations originally shown have been destroyed. Available are the supplemental maps of West End, Bucktown, Spanish Fort and Milneberg, although not online. A physical mapped out driving tour is available for the nominal cost of $5. Use paypal.com to send $5 to drkjazz@basinstreet.com for your copy of the map. Included are passing historic jazz locations including Storyville, Funky Butt Hall and Congo Square. A must document for both the serious jazz scholar and the amateur lover of jazz.

THE ROLE OF RIVERBOATS IN THE HISTORY OF JAZZ

2000 (220 PAGES)
Along with the riverboats, early jazz recordings, minstrel bands and vaudeville helped spread the music of jazz. Written jazz music, for the many dance orchestras playing jazz for the first time, was also responsible for the propagation of live jazz music.

ORIGINS AND INFLUENCES OF JAZZ MUSIC

1995 Vol. I & II (343 pages)
   Volume One
   Volume Two

Volume I examines early Negro music and the social developments of slavery, social mores, economics and historic material to help understand the contemporary scene of the era prior to the evolving of jazz.

Volume II examines the history and the role of the Negro Spiritual. There is an appendix containing numerous articles on early Negro music in America.

EARLY JAZZ PARISHES

Jazz music and dancing are well documented in the country parishes surrounding New Orleans, many New Orleans band and musicians are mentioned playing these small towns. The big city atmosphere possessed many bands and dances to choose from, whereas these appearances of city bands in small, often isolated towns were special occasions for the populace.

The small town newspapers have become important sources of valuable research information. From these one can chronologically organize the history of the evolution of brass and string bands and their development into the jazz band. Parishes include: St. Tammany, Plaquemines, Orleans (Algiers/Gretna), St. Bernard, LaFourche, Terrebonne, Assumption, Ascension, St. Charles, St. John, St. James, Tensas, East Carroll and Baton Rouge.

PONTCHARTRAIN – THE MOTHER OF ALL JAZZ RIVERS(Covington, Mandeville, Abita Springs, Madisonville, Hammond, Pouchatoula & Bogalusa)
1996 (324 pages)

ASCENSION (Donaldsonville)
1996 (361 pages)

LAFOURCHE (Thibodeaux, Napoleonville – including Terrabonne, Ascension and Assumption Parishes)
1997 (314 pages)

PLAQUEMINES (Point a la Hache, Magnolia & Deer Range Plantations)
1997 (217 pages)

WEST BANK (Orleans Parish & St. Bernard, St. John & St. James Parishes)
1997 (154 pages)

BATON ROUGE (and vicinity)
1997 (410 pages)

THE JAZZ LECTURES

1996 (84 pages)
Lectures on important jazz subjects given by Dr. Koenig to the leading music/jazz societies of the United States:

  “WOMAN PIANISTS IN EARLY NEW ORLEANS JAZZ”

  “SPORTS AND NEW ORLEANS JAZZ”

  “LOUISIANA BRASS BANDS AND THEIR HISTORY IN RELATION TO JAZZ HISTORY”

  “THE MUSIC OF THE 20’s”

  “EVA GAUTHIER-THE FIRST CLASSICAL JAZZ CONCERT”

“QUARTET” THE HISTORY OF THE “CAKEWALK”, “COON SONG”, “MINSTREL MUSIC” AND THE “TWO STEP”

2002 (615 pages)
“Quartet” examines the ancestors of Jazz: from the early Minstrel shows, to the cakewalk, tot he Two-Step/March, to the Coon songs. The Quartet examines the history of these forms by examining the music, studying hundreds of examples of musical scores from 1829 to 1929. Minstrel music was not syncopated. The Cakewalk characteristic rhythm (short, long, short) was a syncopated musical figure. The Coon songs (in its latter stages) employed syncopation and ragtime accompaniment to its melodies. The Two-Step (many of them Cakewalks) added syncopation also in its latter stages – all four forms were the ancestors from which jazz music evolved. Through the musical examples new theories and facts are brought to the reader’s knowledge.

  History and Music of the Coonsongs
  Walking to Gloryland
  The History and Music of the Minstrels
  The March and Two Step

EARLY WEST COAST JAZZ

2007 (187 pages)
Jazz came to the West Coast in the late teens and early 1920s. A number of jazz musicians came from New Orleans to the West Coast among them Buddy Petit, Jelly Roll, Papa Mutt Carey, Kid Ory and many others. There was an active jazz scene in Los Angeles not only for dances but for film work. This book looks into the many fine jazz orchestras that made the West Coast their home. Their activities brought jazz to the forefront in Los Angles. Included is a bio of ‘Reb’ Spikes and his many activities.

THE EXPANSION OF JAZZ

2009 (266 pages)
Would jazz music have died if not receiving exposure of its art? The spread of jazz in the United States and the world was assisted by various means: a study of many of these media that exposed this new Jazz; Vaudeville, Excursions (both trains and boats), bucking contests, hayrides, skating rinks, movies, baseball, picnics, plus many other mediums that used jazz music as it was evolving. Also explored are the early ‘jazz’ arrangements published so that the bands in all parts of the U.S. could play music in a jazzy style.

CLASSICS IN JAZZ

2009 (260 pages)
This book explores the use of jazz and its characteristics in classical music. We read about the use of the ‘jazz tempo’ – whether or not to use ‘jazz’ in classical material. Also given is a transcription of the ‘counterpoint’ used by the ODJB in their arrangement and recording of ‘Livery Stable Blues’ Included are a number of early magazine articles on jazz and its influence on classical music.

We find many articles on the influence of jazz throughout the world. The great Darius Milhaud, a jazz enthusiast is examined and an analysis and transcription of his use of jazz (said to be the first in classical music) in “Le Boeuf dur le toit” (the Creation of the World”) Also is a look at Debussy’s “Golliwog’s Cakewalk” and other classical works influenced by jazz.

Also given is information on jazz in England, Ireland, Scotland, Germany, Austria, Italy, a little on Japan and China, Russia, Sofia and Europe in general. Finally the history and music of what has been called a “Jazz Opera’ by E. Frank Harling – A Light from St. Agnus.

THE DANCE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON EARLY JAZZ

1999 (288 pages)
Many time it is not emphasized that early jazz music was dance music. The music that has now become an art form began as dance music and its evolution is in step with the development of various new, innovative , dance styles. Important in the history of jazz is the history of the accompanying ‘jazz’ dances, namely the Charleston, Grizzly Bear, the Racquet, etc.

HISTORIC LOCATIONS IN EARLY NEW ORLEANS JAZZ ERA

2009 (94 pages)
This book gives the history of many sites related to jazz heritage. Included: the Halfway House, the Lyric Theater, the Eagle Saloon, the French Opera House, Pikes Hall in Baton Rouge, the Tango Belt, the Dew Drop Social Hall, the Destruction of Louis Armstrong’s house,the Dance Halls, and the Alley.

FOREIGN JAZZ

2009 (143 pages)
European countries accepted jazz in a very exciting way. Jazz was used both in popular dance music and classical music. Darius Milhaud, the French composer was highly influenced by jazz and wrote The Creation of the World — which was perhaps the earliest use of jazz in a serious classical composition. Most all European countries as well as many Far Eastern countries accepted jazz. Countries included are:” France, England, Ireland, Scotland, Germany , Austria, Italy, China, Japan, Russia, and Sofia. There are numerous articles by combined Europeans groups that met and discussed jazz.

THE EMMETT KENNEDY SCRAPBOOK

2009 (460 pages)
Emmett Kennedy, the uncle of Emmett Hardy, was a very famous entertainer and author. He authored a number of books on early Negro culture and Negro spirituals. He performed these spirituals and songs wearing blackface. This practice was accepted in the early minstrels and we find letters complimenting Kennedy by Booker T. Washington, woman’s rights advocate Dorothy Dix and violinist Mischa Elman. This e-book is a compilation of hundreds of rare photos, magazine articles and advertisement compromising the life of Kennedy.

“MELLOWS” THE TIMES AND WRITINGS OF ROBERT EMMETT KENNEDY

1995 (133 pages)
Emerging as an important figure in the early 20th Century in the music of New Orleans, Robert Emmett Kennedy (Uncle to Emmett Hardy) was one of the earliest researchers and performers of the Negro music of New Orleans. There are 26 early New Orleans spirituals presented and discussed by Mr. Kennedy. Kennedy was the author of more than 6 books on the life and music of New Orleans, with a few books written in Negro dialect. Kennedy was the champion of early Negro spirituals, street calls and work songs. Additional material on Kennedy was secured from the journals kept by Kennedy.

MORE MELLOWS – ROBERT EMMETT KENNEDY

1997 (178 pages)
Published some time after “Mellows” it containing more spirituals collected by Mr. Kennedy. Kennedy was the uncle of Emmett Hardy, the cornetist.

THE HISTORY OF THE MARCH

1995 (60 pages)
The history of the march, its musical form and its use throughout history is examined. Few books have been written on the history of the March. Included are two chapters on “Louisiana Brass Bands: Their His history in Relation to Jazz History, (Appendix I), and “Militant Negro Spirituals.” (Appendix II).

HISTORY AND PERFORMANCE OF POLYPHONY

1995 (117 pages)
Early jazz was called collective improvising. The interpretation and performance of any style of polyphony is similar, and perfecting a good ‘Dixieland’ band is the same as performing a contrapuntal form such as the fugue. A history of polyphony is presented along with a chapter of the ‘polyphony’ on the first jazz recording.

JAZZ IN PRINT: AN ANTHOLOGY

1997 (998 pages)
A collection of articles relating to the history of jazz from the latter decades of the 19th Century to approximately 1929. This anthology fills the void that has existed in jazz academia, and is patterned after the well-known Strunk’s “Source Readings in Music History.” Starting with an account of a slave funeral, there are articles on the history of pre-jazz and includes articles on early Negro music, the cakewalk era, ragtime and the jazz of the 20’s. A must reference volume for jazz scholars, colleges and public libraries.

RAGTIME IN PRINT

2009 (117 pages)
These numerous articles are taken out of “Jazz in Print I” and given so researchers can concentrate on the evolution of ragtime.

SCRAPBOOK OF JAZZ

1999 (255 pages)
A collection of jazz sheet music, pictures, advertisements, jazz locations, caricatures and cartoons of jazz, with text explaining the progress of jazz through these items presented. Included are early brass bands, string bands and jazz bands.

BASEBALL AND NEW ORLEANS JAZZ

2009 (228 pages)
This book examines how Baseball and Jazz grew together, with most early jazz bands traveling with baseball teams for games. They played music at the beginning, during and after the game. The games almost always ended with a dance on a pavilion in the infield. It also shows how the word jazz was first used as a baseball slang.

THE EVOLUTION OF WRITTEN JAZZ

1995 (278 pages)
Written jazz and jazz orchestration became the vogue during the twenties. Jazz began as dance music and evolved in the city of New Orleans. This study begins with the popular French Quadrille and other dance music and examines the evolution of jazz elements into a written style. This style became the center point for the progression of jazz music during the twenties.

THE EVOLUTION OF RAGTIME & BLUES TO JAZZ-A

THE EVOLUTION OF RAGTIME & BLUES TO JAZZ-B

1995 (184 pages) Split into Parts A & B
Traces the evolution of the ragtime/cakewalk
and blues styles. The use of syncopation is examined with its use throughout a complete composition. The use of ‘blues’ in early jazz music is analyzed. (A blues style was adapted within a popular song but it was not the traditional 12 bar blues progression.

INTERPRETATION AND PERFORMANCE OF BAND MUSIC: THE CONDUCTOR’S BUIDE TO ARTISTIC PERFORMANCE: CONCERT BAND & JAZZ BAND

1998 (150 pages)
A director/conductor’s guide to the interpretation of musical notation, style, techniques and musical elements needed to present the most artistic and meaningful performance of music. Both the traditional classical and jazz styles are explained with many musical examples. Included is a chapter on how to improvise.

“WORDS OF MOUTHS”: JAZZ ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEWING

1994 (21 pages)
This is a work on how to research and conduct an oral interview. Given are the locations of the institutions in New Orleans where a scholar may do early jazz research. It was written to save the jazz scholar time and present him with knowledge and materials for his research while in New Orleans. “Right and wrong,” examples of two interviews and a guide to help the scholar conduct an oral interview that is both informative and useful are provided.

JAZZ FUNERALS IN NEW ORLEANS AND THE SURROUNDING PARISHES
NEGRO AND WHITE FUNERAL BANDS

Funeral processions are seen in most every civilized country but have a special, colorful and emotional connection to the city of New Orleans. The use of brass bands for funerals is seen and heard both in playing dirge and solemn hymns as well as jazz orientated music.

ESSAYS 7

This essay examines important songs in popular and jazz history. Also the history and use of the saxophone, and the evolution of syncopation.

ESSAYS 4

There are a number of important figures in jazz development and progress that are not known today. Jazz spread over the world and major figures in their country become known jazz stars. Men such as Arnaud, Wiener and Vauchant among others and American orchestra leaders Kahn, Specht, Lopez and Guarente played a part in performing early jazz. Also included is the use of mutes in early jazz, Jazz in early radio and the Latin influence on jazz and other items.

NEW COLLECTIONS OF BIOS 3

A collection of bios of famous musicians in the jazz era. All left their mark on music; in jazz music, in popular music and in the progress of music. Included are orchestra leaders Paul Whiteman, Vincent Lopez, Ted Lewis, Fate Marable, and Steve Brown; pianist Eubie Blake and popular composer Edward Taylor Paull known for his composition on historic events and very, very colorful sheet music covers.

ST. CHARLES PARISH

St Charles Parish is West of New Orleans and boarders Orleans Parish and Lake Pontchartrain. Some of the towns in St. Charles: Luling, Norco, Edgar, and Hanville.
We do not have as much material on this Parish but we do have a good outline of the musical activity of the parish.

ST. JOSEPH BRASS AND STRING BAND AND THE PEERLESS BRASS BAND OF DONALDSONVILLE

Donaldsonville, La was once the capital of Louisiana, and was the town that possessed great band music. One of the town’ principal musicians was Clairborne Williams.


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